UH Primary Care

Take Control of Your Health

When you build a relationship with a trusted primary care provider, they will get to know your medical and family history, your risk factors for certain medical conditions and your lifestyle priorities. This comprehensive understanding of you as a person helps your provider manage any chronic conditions you might have; recommend age-appropriate screenings to find potential problems early when they are most treatable; and, keep you up-to-date on vaccinations that can prevent disease.

Find a doctor that is right for you

Understand your family health history and known risk factors

Schedule regular checkups and screenings

Stay on top of your vaccine schedule

Establish good habits

Goals to Get You On the Path Toward Better Health

Setting realistic, achievable goals is a great way to start building a healthier lifestyle. Roy Buchinsky, MD, UH Director of Wellness explains how to get started.

Learn More

Establishing Care with A PCP

Whether you’re looking to find a new primary care doctor or seeking one for the first time, the best preventive care is outstanding primary care. We believe forming a trusting relationship with a primary care provider (PCP) is the best way to preserve and protect your most valuable asset – your health. Your provider will get to know you as a whole person – your lifestyle and health goals, your family medical history and your risk factors for certain conditions, including heart disease, diabetes and cancer.

Find a UH Doctor

Your Primary Care Provider Can Help Treat Your Mental Health, Too

How Your Primary Care Physician Can Help Manage Your Chronic Disease

Prevent Avoidable Chronic Conditions and Disease with an Annual Wellness Visit


Health Risk Factors by Generation

There are many health conditions that become more common as we age and others that can arise at any stage of life due to genetic factors. This is why it is essential to discuss your family history with your provider - knowing if you have any genetic predispositions to certain diseases will help them tailor the types and frequency of screenings that are recommended for you.

Generation GEN Z Millennials GEN X Baby Boomers Silent Generation
Age Range 18 – 25 26 – 40 41 – 56 57 – 75 76 – 93
Health Risk Factors Cervical cancer
High cholesterol
Melanoma
Mental health
Testicular cancer
Cervical cancer
High cholesterol
Reproductive difficulties
Skin changes
Stress
Weight gain
Breast cancer
Colon cancer
Heart disease
High blood pressure
High cholesterol
Breast cancer
Colon cancer
Heart disease
High blood pressure
High cholesterol
Osteoporosis
Prostate cancer
Stroke
Arthritis
Breast cancer
Diabetes
Heart failure
High blood pressure
Osteoporosis
Prostate cancer
Stroke

Preparing For Every Milestone

Young Adults: Planning For Your Healthy Future Should Start Now

Turning 40? It's Time to Get Serious About Health Screenings

How To Manage the Health Challenges of Your 50s and Beyond

Your Guide to Health Screenings by Age

Whatever your age or stage of life, prevention is the best medicine. Health screenings are important for detecting and preventing diseases and managing risk factors.

For Women   For Men

Women
Age Timing Screening
20s 30s20s and 30s MonthlyOnce a month Breast self-exam
1 YearOnce a year Blood pressure, height, weight, body mass index (BMI)
Breast self-exam
Cardiovascular evaluation
Comprehensive physical exam
Depression screening
Skin cancer screening
Human papilloma virus (HPV) tests
2 YearsEvery 2 to 5 years as recommended by your primary care provider Blood glucose test
Eye exam
Pap test
5 YearsEvery 5 years Cholesterol
As NeededAs needed and recommended by your primary care provider Sexually transmitted diseases (STD) tests
40s40s All of the above screenings, plus the following:
1 YearOnce a year Mammogram
5 YearsEvery 2 - 5 years as recommended by your primary care provider Cholesterol
10YearsEvery 10 years Colonoscopy
40s50s All of the above screenings, plus the following:
5 YearsEvery 5 years Bone density test
Thyroid panel
10YearsEvery 10 years Cardiac calcium scoring
Hearing test
60s60s All of the above screenings, plus the following:
1 YearOnce a year Dementia and Alzheimer’s screening
Men
Age Timing Screening
20s 30s20s and 30s MonthlyOnce a month Testicular self-exam
1 YearOnce a year Blood pressure, height, weight, body mass index (BMI)
Cardiovascular evaluation
Comprehensive physical exam
Depression screening
Skin cancer screening
Testicular cancer screening
2 YearsEvery 2 – 5 years as recommended by your primary care provider Blood glucose test
Eye exam
5 YearsEvery 5 years Cholesterol
As NeededAs needed and recommended by your primary care provider Fertility testing
Sexually transmitted diseases (STD) tests
40s40s All of the above screenings, plus the following:
2YearsEvery 2 – 5 years as recommended by your primary care provider Cholesterol
10YearsEvery 10 years Colonoscopy
50s50s All of the above screenings, plus the following:
1 YearOnce a year Cholesterol
Low-dose lung CT scan
10YearsEvery 10 years Cardiac calcium scoring
Hearing test
As neededAs needed and recommended by your primary care provider Bone density test
60s60s All of the above screenings, plus the following:
1 YearOnce a year Dementia and Alzheimer’s screening
As NeededAs needed and recommended by your primary care provider Abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA)
Prostate specific antigen (PSA) screening

Please note these are screening recommendations are a baseline and certain medical conditions and health risks might require additional screenings. Talk to your health care provider.

Learn More on Age-Appropriate Screenings

3 Health Screenings You May Not Know About – But Should

The Screening Every Older Adult Should Get

11 Health Screening Tests Every Woman Should Have

Recommended Vaccinations by Age

Vaccinations are a valuable, science-based tool for the prevention of disease. Many adults are not aware that even though they received all the childhood immunizations, they may still need boosters to maintain protection. Also, as we age, certain diseases like shingles and pneumonia are more likely to occur and can, in some people, pose a serious health threat. Being vaccinated can prevent or lessen the severity of disease in people of all ages. Talk to your primary care provider about your immunization history and which vaccines are recommended for you and your family.

AGES 20s, 30s & 40s 50s 60s
Vaccine & Frequency
COVID-19Two dose series given 3-8 weeks apart. Plus one or two booster(s) depending on age. Checkmark Checkmark Checkmark
Hepatitis A (HepA)After discussion with your health care provider. Checkmark Checkmark Checkmark
Hepatitis B (HepB)After discussion with your health care provider. Checkmark Checkmark Checkmark
Human papilloma virus (HPV)Three dose series through 26 years old. For 27 - 45, after discussion with your health care provider. Checkmark
Influenza (flu)Yearly Checkmark Checkmark Checkmark
Measles, mumps, rubella (MMR)One or two dose series, 28 days apart depending on age (if born in 1957 or later), have no previous infection and/or pose a risk of being exposed to measles and mumps. Checkmark Checkmark Checkmark
Pneumonia (Pheumovax)One dose of Pheumovax. If dose was given < 65 years old wait 5 years before next dose. (Certain health conditions might require a one or two dose series before 60. Talk to your provider.) Checkmark Checkmark Checkmark
Pneumonia (Prevnar 20)One dose of Prevnar 20. Only given once in a lifetime. Checkmark
Shingles (Shingrix)Two dose series given 2-6 months apart. Checkmark Checkmark
Tetanus, diphtheria and pertussis (Tdap)One dose of Tdap, then Td or Tdap booster every 10 years. One dose per pregnancy between 27-36 weeks gestation. Checkmark Checkmark Checkmark
Varicella (Chickenpox)Two dose series, 28 days apart depending on age (if born in 1980 or later) and no previous infection. Checkmark Checkmark Checkmark

5 Vaccines Recommended for Adults Age 65 and Older

Shingles Vaccine: Who Should Get it and When?

COVID-19 Vaccine and Flu Shot Spacing: Is It Needed?

sterile gloved hand pressing down bandage on arm

Get the Flu Vaccine. Your Heart Will Thank You

Getting your annual flu vaccine protects you from developing serious respiratory symptoms. But did you know it can also protect your heart?

Learn More

UH Services to Help with Healthy Habits

University Hospitals supports our patients in their journey toward a healthier life. We do this by offering educational resources and carefully structured programs to help them achieve their health goals. Programs include: