Infection Control Outcomes

Infection control involves many actions taken to prevent the spread of infection in the health care setting in and among patients, staff, visitors, or from the health care environment. Most health care settings have an Infection Control Nurse or Infection Control Department to perform oversight and monitoring.

Actions focus on:

  • Prevention, via hand hygiene/hand washing, cleaning/disinfection/sterilization of instruments, vaccination, surveillance, maintaining safe construction barriers, maintaining a safe care environment via cleaning procedures, maintenance of air handling, water systems and food handling.
  • Monitoring/investigation of demonstrated or suspected spread of infection within a particular health-care setting (surveillance, institution of isolation precautions and outbreak investigation)

Types of Infections Measured

Central Line Associated Blood Stream Infections (CLABSI) Acquired while in Intensive Care Units: A central line is a catheter (small tube) that is inserted and passed into a large vein or the heart. Central line blood stream infections can often be prevented.

This score tell you the number of Central Line Associated Blood Stream Infections (CLABSI) among patients in University Hospitals ICUs (Intensive Care Units) per 1,000 central line days.

What does “Central Line Days” mean? Central lines are counted each day. Each patient with one or more central lines at the time the count is performed is counted as one central line day.

Lower numbers are better. All hospitals aim for zero central line infections.

Infection Control

Ventilator Associated Pneumonia Acquired while in Intensive Care Units: Ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP) is pneumonia that develops 48 hours or longer after mechanical ventilation is given by means of an endotracheal tube or tracheostomy. Ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP) results from the invasion of the lower respiratory tract and lung parenchyma by microorganisms. Intubation compromises the integrity of the oropharynx and trachea and allows oral and gastric secretions to enter the lower airways.

This score tell you the number of Ventilator Associated Pneumonia (VAP) among patients in University Hospitals ICUs (Intensive Care Units) per 1,000 device days.

Lower numbers are better. All hospitals aim for zero VAP infections.

Infection Control

Catheter Associated Urinary Tract Infection Acquired while in Intensive Care Units: A urinary tract infection, or “UTI,” is an infection that can occur in your kidneys, in the tubes that take urine from your kidneys to your bladder, or in your bladder.

You have an indwelling catheter (tube) in your bladder. "Indwelling" means inside your body. This catheter drains urine from your bladder into a bag outside your body.

  • When you have an indwelling urinary catheter, you are more likely to develop a UTI. These infections are more likely if you have the catheter in place for a long time.
  • Bacteria cause most UTIs that are related to having a catheter. A fungus called Candida can also cause UTIs.

This score tell you the number of Catheter Associated Urinary Tract Infections (CAUTI) among patients in University Hospitals ICUs (Intensive Care Units) per 1,000 device days.

Lower numbers are better. All hospitals aim for zero CAUTI infections.

Infection Control

  • Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) Blood Stream Infections Acquired while in the Hospital: This score tells you the number of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) blood stream infections per 1,000 patient days (total number of days spent by all patients in the hospital).

    We are reporting infections per 1,000 patient days. Sometimes infections are reported per 10,000 patient days. It is important to make sure the number of patient days is the same when comparing one hospital to another.

    This information is important because blood stream infections can sometimes be life threatening. Unlike most infections, blood stream infections spread through the entire body, sometimes causing the patient to become seriously ill. Blood stream infections can most often be prevented by preventing infections that can get into the blood. Treating those infections quickly and thoroughly can minimize the risk of spreading infection into the blood stream.

    Lower rates are better.

  • Multidrug-Resistant – Gram-Negative Bacilli (MDR-GNB): This score tells you the number of Multidrug-Resistant – Gram-Negative Bacilli (MDR-GNB) blood stream infections per 1,000 patient days (total number of days spent by all patients in the hospital).

    We are reporting infections per 1,000 patient days. Sometimes infections are reported per 10,000 patient days. It is important to make sure the number of patient days is the same when comparing one hospital to another.

    This information is important because blood stream infections can sometimes be life threatening. Unlike most infections, blood stream infections spread through the entire body, sometimes causing the patient to become seriously ill. Blood stream infections can most often be prevented by preventing infections that can get into the blood. Treating those infections quickly and thoroughly can minimize the risk of spreading infection into the blood stream.

    Lower rates are better.

  • Clostridium difficile (C. diff) Infections Acquired while in the Hospital: This score tells you the number of Clostridium difficile (C. diff or CDI) infections per 1,000 patient days (total number of days spent by all patients in the hospital).

    We are reporting infections per 1,000 patient days. Some hospitals report infections per 10,000 patient days. It is important make sure patient days are the same when comparing hospitals. Only infections identified by the hospital laboratory that developed on or after day 4 of hospital admission are included.

    This information is important because CDI is a bacterial infection that causes diarrhea and more serious intestinal conditions, such as colitis (inflammation of the colon). People who get CDI are usually elderly and are taking antibiotics for another infection. Clostridium difficile bacteria are found in the feces (bowel movements) of an infected person. Other people can become infected if they touch items or surfaces that are contaminated with the bacteria and then touch their mouth.

    Lower numbers are better.

Infection Control
UH Ahuja Medical Center
Facility Acquired MRSA bacteremia 0.00/1,000 Patient Days
Facility Acquired Multi-Drug Resistant-GNB 0.01/1,000 Patient Days
Facility Onset C diff 0.35/1,000 Patient Days

Make an Appointment

Schedule your appointment with a specialist at University Hospitals.
216-593-5500

More Scheduling Options

Need to Refer a Patient?

Click here for Patient Referrals

Browse Services A-Z

Maps and Directions

Click here for directions