Accelerating Breakthrough Discoveries into Medicines

Patricia C. Weber, PhD

Patricia C. Weber, PhD

Patricia C. Weber, PhD, is a member of the Harrington Discovery Institute Innovation Support Center panel and is also co-founder of Imiplex, a nanoarchitecture start-up. Dr. Weber’s career spans over 30 years in academia, and large and small business ventures. Dr. Weber began her career in biotechnology and drug discovery, and she held senior positions at DuPont CR&D, DuPont Merck Pharmaceuticals and Schering Plough Research Institute where she established and supervised multidisciplinary groups for structure-based drug design. She and her teams contributed to wide-ranging discovery programs that produced clinical drug candidates, including antithrombotic agents, antivirals for HIV and Hepatitis C, and BACE inhibitors for Alzheimer’s disease, among others. Dr. Weber later worked as Chief Scientific and Business Development Officer of ExSAR Corp, a private biotechnology company using hydrogen-deuterium exchange mass spectrometry to characterize protein stability and ligand binding. Her management and technical experience spans protein production and purification, biophysical characterization of proteins, enzymology, protein mass spectrometry, protein structure determination by NMR spectrometry and X-ray crystallography with an overarching emphasis on structure-based drug design applications and methodologies integrating computational and experimental approaches.

Dr. Weber received a BS in Chemistry from the University of Montana and PhD in Chemistry from the University of Arizona. Originally trained in macromolecular X-ray crystallography, Dr. Weber carried out postdoctoral studies of DNA-binding proteins with Nobel Laureate Thomas Steitz at Yale University. Dr. Weber is a contributing member of the Faculty of 1000, active in numerous NIH review and private foundation advisory roles, and serves as an industrial mentor for the NSF iCORPS Program. Dr. Weber is an author on over 100 published papers, and an inventor on 20 US patents covering drug discovery methods, engineered proteins for use in biotechnology and nanotechnology, and compounds developed using structure-based drug design.